Post-Doctoral Fellow:

Bonnie Le  

Bonnie Le

 

Bonnie’s research examines how the motivation to care for others, interpersonal goal pursuit, and emotion regulation impact personal and relationship well-being in close relationships. Her research has examined these processes particularly in the context of prosocial behavior and she uses multiple methods to test her questions, including daily experience designs, dyadic laboratory interactions, and physiological assessments

 

 

 

 

 

 

PhD Students:

I am interested in how social hierarchy and inequality shape individual and group behavior in organizations. Status and power are important motivating forces of behavior, and social class distinctions carry important psychological implications in terms of how people think, feel, and act. In addition, the more noticeable class disparities are, the more concerned with social hierarchy people become. Some general research questions I explore include: How might certain organizational contexts fuel and perpetuate inequality? Are Western findings on the psychology of social class generalizable across different cultures? More specifically, I am currently investigating if there are class-based differences on why people pursue leadership positions in organizations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

                     Joyce He    

                     Joyce He

 

 

I am interested in leadership and what constitutes effective leadership. In particular, I am interested in the role of emotional intelligence in leadership and how leaders can harness their emotional intelligence to interact with followers to maximize performance and satisfaction, leading to downstream benefits for the organization. Beyond emotional intelligence in leaders, I am also interested in examining the role that emotional intelligence plays at the workplace in employees. I would like to investigate whether emotional intelligence leads to higher job performance and job satisfaction, and the specific mechanisms of these links.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am interested in how an individual's social class shapes their ability to acquire resources and developmental relationships at work. I’m also curious about how individuals sustain and benefit from pre-existing mentoring relationships when class differences are activated, and whether long-term professional outcomes are different for both mentors and protégés who experience power distance and status differences in their relationships.

 


 

 

 

 

 

Chloe Kovacheff

Chloe Kovacheff

I am interested in factors, individual differences, and motivations that predict or encourage prosocial behavior, both at the organizational level and at the larger societal level.  Within an organizational context, I am interested in moral/ethical, prosocial and pro-environmental behavior by organizational citizens, as well as in related organizational innovation and change.  At the societal level, I study how economic inequality shapes prosocial and political behavior as well as what leads individuals to engage in effective collective action on social and environmental issues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research Assistants:

I am currently a fourth year student studying at the University of Toronto as a psychology research specialist (thesis). My particular passions are focused in organizational behaviour and social psychology, areas I am keen to explore further during my undergraduate research career and subsequently in graduate school.

 

 





 

 

 

 

I am currently in the fourth year of my undergraduate studies at the University of Toronto (St. George), pursuing a psychology research specialist (thesis) degree. I am interested in various aspects of psychology, including clinical psychology, organizational behaviour, and physiological psychology. As a research assistant, I hope to further narrow my interests, develop valuable skills, and gain research experience to help pursue graduate school in the future.